Displacement, Segregation (News)

For New Life, Blacks in City Head to South

Submitted by News Desk on Thu, 08/04/2011 - 2:44pm
Source: 

In Deborah Brown’s family lore, the American South was a place of whites-only water fountains and lynchings under cover of darkness. It was a place black people like her mother had fled.

But for Ms. Brown, 59, a retired civil servant from Queens, the South now promises salvation.

Three generations of her family — 10 people in all — are moving to Atlanta from New York, seeking to start fresh economically and, in some sense, to reconnect with a bittersweet past. They include Ms. Brown, her 82-year-old mother and her 26-year-old son, who has already landed a job and settled there.

Interview with members of the California Citizens Redistricting Commission

Submitted by News Desk on Wed, 08/03/2011 - 3:34pm
Source: 
The California Redistricting Commission is set to release its completed political district maps on Friday. Commissioners Cynthia Dai, of San Francisco, and Connie Galambos Malloy, of Oakland, talk with Belva Davis about the process and challenges of drawing new district lines for California.

Transit-Oriented Development and Communities of Color: A Field Report

Submitted by Land Use on Mon, 04/04/2011 - 12:04am

By Gen Fujioka

The following article originally appeared in The Planner's Network and is reposted here with permission from the author, Gen Fujioka (Senior Policy Advocate at the National Coalition for Asian Pacific American Community Development).

Transit-oriented development (TOD) has become a leading policy prescription for reversing America’s sprawling path of growth. The Obama administration, through its Sustainable Communities Initiative, state and local agencies and progressive think-tanks all emphasize TOD as a means to achieve housing, transportation and environmental goals, often through public-private partnerships. But as TOD has been justifiably promoted as the cleaner alternative to auto-dependent development, gaps have appeared in the discourse that understate its costs. This report seeks to fill in some of those gaps with snapshots from four communities of color that have been impacted by various stages of TOD in the cities of Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Minneapolis–Saint Paul.

Oakland Airport Connector Ignored Civil Rights Laws

Submitted by Staff on Wed, 03/31/2010 - 11:25am
Source: 
The Federal Transit Administration pulled $70 million in stimulus funds from BART's Oakland Airport Connector project last month based on our civil rights complaint, finding that BART ignored civil rights laws. Fortunately, the Bay Area didn't lose that funding - it was distributed among the region's ailing transit systems. But the transit administration's action makes it clear that public money must be spent fairly or agencies will be held accountable.

Attorney General joins in suit to invalidate Pleasanton's 29,000-unit housing cap law

Submitted by Staff on Thu, 06/25/2009 - 2:30pm

Brown Sues Pleasanton Over Housing Limit

Submitted by Staff on Thu, 06/25/2009 - 2:15pm


Wednesday, June 24, 2009


(06-24) 18:14 PDT PLEASANTON -- State Attorney General Jerry Brown joined a
legal challenge Wednesday to Pleasanton's 13-year-old limit on housing
construction, arguing that the East Bay community is defying state housing
laws and adding to urban sprawl, vehicle use and greenhouse gas emissions.

"Pleasanton's draconian and illegal limit on new housing forces people to
emailaddress: 
E-mail Bob Egelko at begelko@sfchro

Luke Cole - Environmental Justice Lawyer Dies

Submitted by admin on Tue, 06/09/2009 - 5:24pm
Source: 



Luke Cole, a San Francisco attorney who was one of the pioneers in the field of environmental justice - filing lawsuits for poor plaintiffs or people of color whose communities were being ravaged by corporate polluters - died in a head-on car crash Saturday in Uganda. He was 46.

emailaddress: 
mtaylor@sfchronicle.com.

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