Race, Poverty, and the Environment

Beyond Public/Private: Understanding Corporate Power

There never has been or will be an unregulated market.

By john a. powell and Stephen Menendian

Who inhabits the circle of human concern? Who counts as a person or a member of the community and what rights accompany that status? In a democratic society, there is nothing more vital than membership. Those who inhabit the circle of human concern, who count as full members, may rightfully demand such concern and expect full regard. It is they who design and give meaning to that society’s very structures and institutions; they have voice. This is the ideal of democracy. But there is an important question: Who inhabits this circle?

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Reimagine! Event Relaunches RP&E with Full House of Activists and Visionaries

Next editorial convening on April 24 from 4 – 6 p.m. at the Movement Strategy Center, 436 14th St., Suite 500, Oakland. RSVP rsvp@reimaginerpe.org

More than 50 people from 28 different organizations joined us for the re-launch on March 27. Our opening panel (RP&E Editor Emeritus Carl Anthony, APEN Executive Director Miya Yoshitani, CCHO co-director Fernando Marti, and Reimagine Project Director Jess Clarke) grounded us in our shared history and affirmed the need we see for this project.

“The environmental movement has introduced the concept of deep history,” Carl Anthony said. “We’re the end point of 13.7 billion years of life on this planet, and we need to begin thinking of that as our heritage,” he said. Fast-forwarding, he noted the great displacement of African Americans with the transatlantic slave trade—somewhere between 7.5 and 12 million African slaves crossed the Atlantic between 1500 and 1800, compared to around 1.5 million Europeans. Slavery, along with the genocide of Native Americans, was part of the expansion of the global economy, “this capitalism we struggle with,” the system underlying the toxic racism and regional inequities RP&E has spotlighted since its first issue 24 years ago.

Relaunch RP&E: Movements Making Media Event

Women and Economic Justice

 
March 27, 6:30 pm at the East Bay Community Foundation

353 Frank H Ogawa Plaza, (Second Floor Conference Room) Oakland, CA 94612 
Join us in shaping the reimagined RP&E.
 
Panel discussion featuring: 

Carl Anthony
Cofounder of Urban Habitat and Breakthrough Communities

Miya Yoshitani
Executive director at the Asian Pacific Environmental Network

Fernando Marti

Co-director Council of Community Housing Organizations

Jess Clarke (Moderator)

Reimgine! RP&E 

We will break out into facilitated subgroups on specific topics, to shape the editorial content of the Reimagined RP&E.

Please RSVP: rsvp@reimaginerpe.org  Feel free to share why you think it's vital for movements to make media and topics you would like to address.

Individuals who would like to join our host committee are also welcome. Please visit our indiegogo page  for more information.

Light refreshments will be served.  The discussion will be followed by a reception to celebrate and reconnect the RP&E community. 

This event is co-sponsored by the Center on Race Poverty and the Environment (CRPE), Urban Habitat (UH), Movement Strategy Center (MSC), and Making Contect; with the participation of: Asian Pacific Environmental Network (APEN) Breakthrough Communities, California Environmental Justice Alliance (CEJA), California for Rural Legal Assistance (CRLA), Center on Race Poverty and the Environment (CRPE), Center for Story-Based Strategy (CSS), Chinese Progressive Association (CPA), Data Center, Earth House Leadership Center, East Bay Alliance for a Sustainable Economy (EBASE), Environmental Health Coalition (EHC), Grassroots Global Justice (GGJ), Making Contact , Marin Grassroots, Media Alliance (MA), Movement Generation (MG), Movement Strategy Center (MSC), Mujeres Unidas y Activas (MUA), People Organized to Demand Economic and Environmental Rights (PODER), People Organized to Win Employment Rights (POWER), Public Advocates (PA), Urban Habitat (UH), Working Partnerships USA (WPUSA), and others.

If you would like to add your organization please contact us or visit our indiegogo.com page where you can endorse and contribute or email rsvp@reimaginerpe.org.

Press Release on Race Poverty & the Environment Relaunch, Feb 25, 2014 from CRPE, UH and MSC

Reimagine! is new home of the national journal of social and environmental justice.

Oakland, California (February 25, 2014) The Center on Race, Poverty and the Environment (CRPE), Urban Habitat (UH), and the Movement Strategy Center (MSC) today announced the launch of a new collaborative publishing endeavor—Reimagine! —which will be the new home of Race, Poverty & the Environment (RP&E), the national journal of social and environmental justice. 

“The journal is as relevant for the environmental justice movement today as it was at its founding in 1990,” said CRPE Executive Director Caroline Farrell. “In fact, given the demographic shifts in the United States, it's more important than ever that policy and advocacy reflect the interests and goals of people of color.”
 
“Reimagine! will bring media professionals together with activists, policy advocates and academic experts to create print, web, and radio content,” said Reimagine’s Project Director Jess Clarke. “This will be media made by the people making change—not just media about them. It will bring a rare synthesis of analysis and on-the-ground experience to bear on environmental and social justice issues.”

Reimagine!

By B. Jesse Clarke

To have any hope of solving the twin crises of accelerating environmental degradation and growing economic inequality, we have to reimagine some fundamental assumptions in both the domestic and economic spheres: What is work? What is leisure? What is labor performed in our homes? How, as a society, do we organize our domestic and work lives so that we can meet our fundamental material and cultural needs?

Cooperative work places have long experience in organizing democratic governance for the means of production, but we need to move beyond industrial-era understandings of social relations. Democratizing the means of reproduction—the social sphere in which we meet the needs for education, health care, and domestic work—is an urgent task that can make another world possible.

Social Movement Unionism: Teachers Can Lead the Way

Teachers, students, and parents across the United States are experiencing wrenching changes in our system of education—from the way schools are run, to who gets to teach, and what may be taught. As students are robbed of meaningful learning and time for play or creativity—in short, anything that’s not tested—hostile politicians blame teachers for an astounding list of social and economic ills ranging from unemployment to moral decline.

In all but the wealthiest school systems in the United States, academic accomplishment has been reduced to scores on standardized tests developed and evaluated by for-profit companies. Parents, teachers, and students—education’s most important stakeholders—have little say in what is taught, while corporate chiefs, politicians in their thrall, and foundations that receive funding from billionaires who profit from pro-business education policies determine the substance of education.[1] While almost every country in the world has experienced this chilling form of social engineering, in the U.S. it is sold to the public as essential to raising educational standards—making individuals and the nation economically competitive.

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