Space, Place, and Regionalism

(Upper left) from RP&E  Vol. 15, No. 1: Who Owns Our Cities

Then 2004“Urban renewal” projects...devastated historically working class, poor neighborhoods around downtown San Francisco, such as the Western Addition, South of Market, and North Beach, driving out many of the poor and people of color. Th[e] process of internal conquest continues to this day, as in the dot-com explosion that made over South of Market, chipped away at the Tenderloin, and encroached on the Inner Mission, leaving many more homeless. A similar process leveled much of central and west Oakland after the war—with a comparable targeting of black neighborhoods—and continues through Mayor Jerry Brown’s campaign to gentrify the central city. —R.A. Walker (“Local Dimensions of Imperial Economic and Development Policy” page 49)

THen 2008

[T]he answer to “who owns the city?” lies with who takes ownership of the whole city, not just our part of it. That is the lesson of the millions of citizen activists who have built community and make change by taking ownership beyond their homes, their neighborhoods, and their parochial concerns. It’s the public will behind the public resources, public policy, and public action needed to make great and sustainable cities. —Rick Cole (“Who Takes Ownership of the City?” page 62)


The 20th Anniversary Issue | Vol. 17, No. 1 | Spring 2010 | Credits

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